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administration to create the electric vehicle infrastructure for the city and began the conversation and the collaboration with the other counties to bring an electric vehicle corridor. it signals our efforts to support the creation of infrastructure to the electric vehicle industry. of course we have encouraged the private automobile creators to join us. today is a wonderful opportunity to do that with a bmw. any of you who noticed the labels in this city, you will certainly noticed the popularity of bmw as a corporation, not only a great company but one that is also on the cutting edge of the use of technology. i want to thank them and welcome them to not only the electric vehicle stage, which they have been working on, but also to this great program they are about to introduce, the drive now and park now technology. joined -- joining us in the car sharing program for their members who want to use bmw products. this idea of cars sharing has been a part of san francisco's objective in creating a more sharing economy. like many other cities, we are congested in our parking. parking i
for this weekend. but i want to not only congratulate unico for locating here in our very exciting part of our city, the international part where so many millions of visitors come every year. in fact, last year in 2011, over 16.3 million visitors came to san francisco and most of them found their way to unit square to the best shopping in the world. this is the center for arts and culture and of course it is our innovation capitol of the world and we are doing all of the right things to continue our success in the city. part of that success, is to work with great corporate citizens like unico and their efforts to make sure that they give their best effort to hire san franciscoans. today we celebrate not just a flag ship store but a store that has made corporate responsibility at the helm of their friend. there is over 500 people that they have already hired in this store. that is a fabulous contribution. they have worked that magic with our office of economic development, having spent weeks to train people who may not have gotten this opportunity. but for their out reach in this store, and then, th
. city college of san francisco has 9 campuses in the city and serves approximately 100,000 students each year. the state has reduced funding to ccsf by core academic courses, provide work force training, provide an education that prepares students for 4 year universities, keep city college libraries and student support services open, keep technology and instructional support up to date, and offset state budget cuts. i'm here with alyssa messer, an english teacher at city college of san francisco. she's the ppt of aft2121, the faculty union, and a proponent of proposition a. also joining us is starchild, a local activist with the libertarian party of san francisco and a former candidate for the san francisco school board. he's an opponent of the measure. thank you both for taking the time to be with us today. >> thank you. >> alyssa, i'd like to give you the opportunity it share the thoughts of your position. >> so proposition a is a temporary 8-year, $79 parcel tax on properties in san francisco. and that money would go directly to supporting city college of san francisco. city colleg
class transportation into the heart of our city, but we know we are building the central subway not just based on our history but for our future. by the year 2040 we will have 100,000 new households and 200,000 new workers and thousands of new daily car trips. we have to prepare for the future. let me close with a couple of quick thoughts. first i believe that our connecting community slogan it is real. we are the greatest city in the united states and we are an incredible city because our communities come together for our subway and for our giants. second, we have to do more. we have to make sure that we're taking care of not just our daily needs on muni and not just our daily needs for the pedestrians, our sierkists, those in cars, those that walk, but we have to make sure we're investing in the long-term projects, and lafltly i just want to say one thing. we know over the history of time great cities don't regret building subways. they regret not building them. thank you. [applause] >> reverend norman fong has been praying for 20 years. he has been a great champion. he has to
>> welcome to city hall. thank you for joining us. thank you for coming out. i want to thank members of the board of supervisors. i want to thank them for being here in this joint recognition of our commissioners and members of 14 different bodies that will be appointed today to committees and commissions. i want to thank all the friends and family for joining us. let me say how excited i am this past week, i have been watching a certain convention. next week, we will have an even more exciting convention to watch. it is of course, in the spirit of the expected national, regional, and state elections we are preparing for. it is also a reminder of the importance of our civic duty and all the different departments we have created. public engagement is extremely important to the way we run government in san francisco. it has always been about public engagement. we need the last bodies come a different viewpoints, different economic classics -- classes, ethnicities, and regions of the city to be well-represented on everything we do because that is what makes our city great. it is
's understand what the issue is and what other jurisdictions have done. to me this is acting responsible as city government and solving issues before they reach crisis levels and protecting future generations. thank you supervisor wiener for your support. >> thank you, mr. president that concludes roll call for introductions. >> i would be happy to be included on that item. >> the next item is the opportunity for the public to address the board for two minutes on items. please note that public comment is not allowed on items that have already been subject to public comment by a board committee. speakers using translation assistance will be allowed twice the time to testimony. and if a member would like to have a document, et cetera. [speaker not understood] ladies and gentlemen, after 28 years i'm here in this place. i have the courage to ask our president and our -- [speaker not understood] for ten months we have no sheriff. i would like to ask you to come with me to give honor to those who died for our country. the third one, which i made a mistake now. i would like to tell to our sheriff
that the recovery and the economic prosperity reaches every neighborhood in our city. technology is not only bringing jobs to san francisco, but it's bringing new solutions to our government. we're embracing the use of technology and to enhance our performance, to measure our performances, to increase transparency and communications with our constituents and to transform our relationships with business and residents. many of you in this room already know how hard it is and how difficult it is to start a business in our city. business owners have to navigate through multiple city departments, state and federal regulations, so now we're deploying technology to streamline this process. we're going to make it easier with a one stop shop to make sure our san francisco businesses can start here, stay here and grow here. innovation is at the forefront. let me mention a special area of innovation that's going on, what i call the silent giant in san francisco. you'll have in front of you this study. it is entitled from our council the world-leading center for health care and research that's pro
buses and in the city we're see ang increase of the use of shuttle buses both within san francisco and those that commute to outside of san francisco. the shuttle buses clearly provide a real benefit around decreasing the amount of trips that are taken by automobiles. often people who choose to go on shuttles, if they didn't have a shuttle as an option would be in a car driving by themselves. so we know there is really great benefits to the shuttle system. we know we're seeing a proliferation of them and we don't quite have a handle in the city how to manage our shuttle -- the private shuttle fleets in the city, especially as they relate to public space that we have around muni stops. so rather than not look at how we can prevent the wild west of the shuttles to become what is happening in san francisco, it's best that we look at how we can manage that. today i am requesting the city attorney to help us draft a permit process to regulate shuttles in san francisco and colleagues, i would be very interested in having input from your offices to help manage that legislation. and th
francisco has the greatest and most vibrant nightlife of any major city in the country. i want to thank my colleague scott wiener for helping to showcase the importance of the other nine to five economy. the impact of all that you do has an impact on our job situation and local economy, and to highlight all of the great work that we can do together to ensure that the sectors that you all represent, the sectors that you work for, that you employ people for connaught is one of the greatest sectors in san francisco. i hope we will take the opportunity of the america's cup to showcase our clubs, our restaurants, our nightlife events. as someone who represents the broadaway neighborhood, an area of town that i used to spend a lot of time in when i was in my 20's -- but actually, very few locals take the time to head to the beach on broadway. our neighborhoods are coming together to say that broadway is open to the rest of the world as well as san francisco. i want to put san francisco back on the map when it comes to music. to make sure that we have the type of entertainment that we used to be
. what's unfortunate about all those is the city of san francisco has boycotted participating in those studies. san francisco says, wait a minute we have a unique responsibility here. we're the only city that stores our water in a national park so let's see how we can do better because we don't do a very good job. orange county recycles 30 million gallons of water a day, we recycle zero. we have a great opportunity to guarantee our water future and undo the damage to yosemite national park. >> sean, one point i know is the hydroelectric power generated by that dam, if i remember it's 41 million dollars? do i have my numbers right? >> there are a number of reasons why hetch hetchy is such a benefit to the city, not the least of which is that it produces carbon free public power to the city of san francisco. one of my favorite lines mike just used is this measure is about consolidating from 8 reservoirs to 7. another way to say that is to say this is about draining one of them, the hetch hetchy valley. have other studies said this is feasible? sure, just like tearing down city hall
to the city, not the least of which is that it produces carbon free public power to the city of san francisco. one of my favorite lines mike just used is this measure is about consolidating from 8 reservoirs to 7. another way to say that is to say this is about draining one of them, the hetch hetchy valley. have other studies said this is feasible? sure, just like tearing down city hall or knocking down the golden gate bridge, that's possible but not feasible. we're not going to spend 3 billion dollars to tear down the hetch hetchy dam. let's not forget, we are also stewards for two dozen cities in the peninsula. over 2 million californians benefit from the foresight of our forefathers almost 100 years ago in building hetch hetchy. while the rest of the state is tying themselves up in knots trying to figure out where to get their water. not only did we have the type of water storage hetch hetchy provides, not only today but in the future, we are in a solid place. and to spend this kind of money, and let's just talk about the $8 million dollars, i think that's one thing we can agree on.
, as an attorney (inaudible). of course, i litigated against the city for some years and got convinced that maybe that does not end up in all of the best results. so i got enticed by (inaudible) to start working in it and... required the people in the city government who wanted to do better but simply did not know how. the passion was there. the passion from our communities have been there for many, many years. and so, fast forward 20 years later i am the mayor of this crazy place and i tried... (inaudible). and i think the great way of doing that is to model new ways to an old passion and as people who want to solve problems and people who have passion to get other people involved in the community and government and people who have a passion to help others. people who have the passion to pledge the welfare of the city ahead of their own success. that is what i want to see happen in government. and so, a lot of it is called innovations because, guess what? i learned very quickly, from years of working with christene and others, innovation is not just about technology, it is about a spirit of bein
and resilience every day. i wanted to take a moment to detail how san francisco is a sustainable seven -- city. being a sustainable city means we are less wasteful. we are leading the nation with over 78% diversion rate. 70% of our waste is recycled, compost, or diverted. being a sustainable city, we are energy-efficient. our energy program is a partnership that we have put together with pg&e and we help small businesses save money on energy bills and reduce carbon emissions. in san francisco, we are also renewable the powered. we have about 3000 solar installations throughout the city and county of san francisco, equalling 19 megawatts of solar. we are also working toward being 100% powered city in the next 10 years. finally, in san francisco, it means we are ev ready. we're making it easier for residents to take charge of their electric cars. the city now operates 50 publicly available charging stations at 15 locations. these are found at city parking garages, at the airport, treasure island, and by the end of 2012, the city will add another 30-40 charges. of note, the public uses the statio
important to scoot, the first is that mayor lee is working hard to make this city an even better place to start and grow a new business, and second, he's been a toothless support of electric vehicles to improve san francisco's environment and the global environment as a whole so please welcome mayor ed lee. >> michael, matt, congratulations to scoot, yes. scoot and san francisco, well, let me first of all put this in some little perspective that i know, i know that we just announced last week, eb week in san francisco to the delight of so many people who want to just have modes of transportation, multiple modes of transportation in a city that are also environmentally friendly and to contribute that reducing our fossil fuels, we are in san francisco world citizens after all and i know it's exciting for ed risken, our mta manager, he and i were excited to talk about different modes of transportation as we create all these exciting events to come to san francisco. i know it's exciting for board president david chiu, we tried to put pods for car sharing in neighborhoods on public streets
keep a city or any government frasa:@r protectinge health of their people. we cannot regulate the health of our people because of a federal regulation. that's ridiculous. in fact, the federal regulation is much, much more narrow than that. the second thing is the at&t argument that the issue that they're worried about is tissue warming. it's a very typical thing in industry for the industry to throw out a kind of red herring that throws you off track. the one thing we know about microwaves from experience is it does not generally warm things. the effect on the body is much more precise than that. and it really is out of respect that this body did the right thing tonight that i'm bringing that to your attention tonight. >> president chiu: are there any other speakers? please step up. >> good evening, supervisors. what a night. i feel relieved but not in any way jubilant. i wanted to give you some comment about public comment. i've stood in these chambers a number of times and watched certain supervisors chastise members of the public for how they've given their public comment a
, revenue and taxes for the city. we have a whole expansion team. it's' private-public partnership. all partnering to make this thing happen. so what is our goals? is that location has changed dram itally and to work cost-effectively to stay onbudget and deliver the project. so this is the context of where we're looking at. it's right on the lines of new central subway. there will be a moscone stop. we have three separate buildings, south opened 32 years and north opened 20 years and moscone west opened a little over ten years ago. for the study looked at that whole area and looked at the three moscone sites and the two garages, 5th and missing the and the moscone garage between folsom and howard. one of the problems with moscone center it was built basically when the neighborhood was not what it is today. and it was built kind of in independent, isolated area to almost a suburban-type building in what has been a very urban area. we market san francisco as a pedestrian-friendly city and pedestrians are not allowed to walk around the moscone center in some areas. so we need to improve
ask reduces traffic congestion in cities where we're deployed and save users money. the big difference with our program and other programs is the ability to do a one-way trip as was previously mentioned and it doesn't require an advance reservation and you have the vehicle for as long as you need it. and you can park the vehicle in any legal on-street parking place. doesn't have to be assigned. currently we object rate in san diego, washington, d.c., portland, austin, miami, and all of our users have the same experience. they find the cars on their app generally and they get the car for as long as they need it. in the cities that we operate, we define a home area as how the system works. this is just a picture of the d.c. home area on the left and a distribution of cars on the right. so, as you can see the cars are evenly distributed throughout the area and it's not because we put the cars there. it's because the members put them there. for san francisco, we envision a program where we would deploy up to 450 cars at least throughout the city and in the month before launch, we would pro
mean more people voting for city attorney and treasurer and if that's not democracy, i don't know what is. there's a reason why this is getting such broad support and i think it deserves the voters' support. >> thank you. and dr. faulkner, would you please summarize why you believe people should be voting against this measure? >> originally it was all odd year elections for city government. the main focus was to have a lot of elections spread out so people would pay attention. that was the idea of the 1932 charter. it is good in the sense given the history of san francisco and, frankly, a lot of governmental problems we had historically, getting people to pay attention to city government has been very important. we had 1901 to 1907 a group called roof ring, they described the 18 supervisors then on the board as, quote, so corrupt they would eat the paint off the walls. that's the reason why we want people to pay attention to their city government. frankly, new england city governments are the small ones and tall hall government is the best of all. we can't do that. but we
at it, we're putting in place an awful lot of things that shape what our city looks like in the future, how our city operates, how we interact with our city. as i started to think about that, i thought, you know, the number of major infrastructure projects going on in our immediate region now are probably -- there are probably more dollars and energy going into that than any time since bart was put through the city. you have the eastern span of the bay bridge. you have the transbay terminal. you have the central subway project. you have the improvement realignment of doyle drive. all of these things are part of the hard wiring of our city that is going to influence the way in which we all interact with it. over the last, say, five to ten years, we have watched as development and interest and people have moved south of market, into mission bay, below that we now that is continuing and we now have projects on the table like the pier 70 project, which ten years ago no one would have thought was a viable mixed-use project, because nobody went there. and that part of it is no longer true.
you for your work. i really believe you go across the entire city above and beyond and you have done a lot of volunteering of your time. i'm sure you have done this a lot. i just want to say thank you for your service. it is really important. we rely a lot on you in the city. there should be more of you in terms of doing what you are doing so thank you. >> i think you are right. should be more of me but unfortunately there's only one of me and the entire san francisco say also can't find another one, even in sfpd or the d.a.'s office. >> can i just say that one thing that really angers me about these scams is many seniors are really isolated and don't have a younger person to talk with them about being careful, so they are so isolated that they don't talk to others. i'm hoping sf safe or the senior organizations and many community-based groups can do more to reduce that isolation for many older folks. but i think that is a broader issue than what law enforcement can deal with but i see that targeting vulnerable that are most isolated is what many criminals do. >> another thing is, a
and reduced. so we ask you to pay more attention to helping the city increase it's maintenance, budgeting and work. thank you. >> thank you very much. is there any other member of the public that would like to speak, please come forward. >> hi, good afternoon. supervisors, i just wanted to point out one thing because this is a public forum, the better market street project is holding pop ups up and down market street every friday this month. basically we have retaken over the kiosks and have public information out there on friday between 12 and 2:00 p.m. this coming friday is at market and powell. near the cable car turn around. it's been an incredibly interesting experience because we reach people that don't normally come to city with public forums. you get the folks that live around there, work around there, tourists and really reaching different people in different sections and getting a much better understanding of how market street simple i want to point out that department of public works just repaved the bike lanes. we are doing short term improvements. lastly, i want to make sure
they have also done it for the right reasons. they want to experience the city in a different way, but one that is in the tradition of san francisco and is reflective of mine, welcoming more people to share in the economy. hopefully the right reasons will create more jobs and get more entrepreneurs involved. i have often said this can be the city for the 100%. everybody can have a chance to fulfill their dreams and make sure they can have a stable income for themselves and their families. i think we are on the verge of discussing things that would invite other members of our city family, department heads, those who work in planning or land use, to be involved in an ongoing discussion that would potentially invite and open up our economy and modernize it even further. a year ago, david chiu and i did not know what the outcome might be, but we were afraid a company called twitter might leave our city and that thousands of jobs will leave this behind. we took a risk and suggested we might be able to revamp our tax code for the benefit of job creation. little did we know a year later,
posed to many of us frequently which is the fact that our city is facing a $4 billion retiree health care liability, mr. mayor, what is your administration doing to address this challenge? >> thank you, supervisor chiu and thank you for raising this important question today. in our retiree health care obligation is something that i care deeply about and a challenge we must all tame take on together. this year the city will pay for the health care of our current retirees and while that number seems large and it is we have a more significant issue on the horizon, the unfunded cost of paying for health care for our current employees once they retire. the last time the city assessed our retirement health care obligation was in 2010 and the estimated unfunded liability was $4.36 billion. we have taken a number of important steps since then to begin to address our structural budget issues in 2008 the city passed proposition b, a charter amendment that lengthed the amount of time an employee must work for the city in order to receive city-sponsored retiree health care benefits. and require
baltimore city police on september 21.the medical examiner ays he suffered bboken ribs... a ruptured spleenn.. and a head injury. caught anderson in a drug deal &pand thatthe choked on drugs.. &pbbt the autopsy report ruled thattout.witnesses... including ndeeson's mother... say officers beet the 46-yearrold man to ddath ong east biidle street and montford avenue. (mr. gordon/atty) ""and thhre was o ouuce of shamm or contrition in the eyes, thoughts, minds or hearts of these officers who engaged in ttis savage attack."(ms. harvey) "we don't have a problem with the baltimore city police deparrment. we have aaproblem with officers thht thake their job.. think they above the law." law."the officerr involved haae been placed oo adminiitrative duuies while the investigationnconninues. ultimately, prosecutors will decide whether charges will bb filed.i'm megan gilliland, fox45 morning news. policc are lookinggfor an esccped inmate, this morning. we're told the man escaped around 7 o 'clock tuesday night... from the northeast district police station... near morgan state universityy tte
the exact same problems of people asking for more and more people and creating a city where there is very wealthy and very poor people. so i would like to give a quick shout out in that direction to supervisor olague, who is having the san francisco housing authority try to film its meetings. it doesn't even meet at city hall and this is the kind of inequity i'm talking about. we need accountability. so i appreciate that and we need that. thank you. >> thank you, mr. everett. >> i'm the type the progressive who grieves believes that we're only as wealthy as the least among us. so means that in san francisco we can only go as far as the african-american young men and women who have been economically disadvantaged for generations here in the city. we need to provide jobs. with when we talk about green jobs of future and sustainable produce, we need to talk about how to feed the single mothers in those communities. we need comprehensive reforms to bring those disadvantaged communitis with us. we cannot provide those folks with jobs unless we reform our drug policies in san francisco, wh
as generations of officers, principals, school site staff, you know, come and go through our city and our schools. and that's the only comment i wanted to make. hopefully we can continue this. >> thank you. thank you very much. and, colleagues, i apologize to the members of the public, we are about to lose a quorum. but let me just simply say that the question of whether or not police officers should be on schools -- at schools, that's ultimately something that the board of education decides. you know, we as a body here do not have the authority to say one way or the other. where we come in is that if the position of the board of education is continue to have that, then there is a memorandum of understanding that outlines that relationship. then i think it is appropriate for this committee to discuss that, which is what we're doing. but ultimately the decision of whether to allow or not allow, that's ultimately up to the san francisco unified school district through its board of education and, you know, in consultation with the superintendent of schools. so, that's not our decision to make here t
. this project needs to be resolved. otherwise, the benefit to the city and a personal view and not approving this project is you probably have a building that sits vacant for many more years. if the person who has the building now can't afford to invest the money and create two units they won't find -- unless someone is independently wealthy. would rather have this family or have a vacant? we are not in a situation where we can do this. unfortunately that is the case here. >> commissioners, motion on the floor as to approve the project as proposed by the project sponsor. on that motion. (voting) motion passes, 5-2, commissioners moore and wu voting against. >> general public comment? i would like to close the meeting in memory of a gentleman named frank -- property owner at fisherman's wharf, our neighbor next door for the wax museum for three generations. his father and my grandfather spent lunches together, father spent a lot of time with frankie. with that the meeting is adjourned. here to introduce the mayor of san francisco, forecast sf sponsor and regional vice president health syste
proud of this kind of public-private partnership to move the city forward. now join me in welcoming the city's first asian american mayor and i'm very proud to say a member of the lee tribe, the 43rd mayor of san francisco, ed lee. (applause). >> thank you, judy, very much for that introduction. good morning, everyone. >> good morning. >> it's great to be here at the san francisco chamber and of course the center for economic development here, your breakfast for 2012, it's my pleasure to be here. i walked in as ed from wells fargo was talking and i just wanted to make sure you knew, i am eternally grateful it the chamber, to wells fargo for helping me create 5,200 jobs for our kids. that's a wonderful accomplishment. i've been your mayor for almost two years now and everybody is coming up to me and asking, are you enjoying it? you know, some of the politics in the city it's hard to enjoy but i will say honestly to steve fox, to the chamber and judy and all of you working together to keep our city successful, i do enjoy creating jobs. and when you see our youth get those paid in
if it turns out the way that most elevated parks and cities around the world have turned out. so i just want to flag it as an area that i think will need continued focus from this group. >> thank you, director. that is always a good point to make. and i do want to mention and certainly bob can follow up on this. in addition to have a connection from the transit tower to the park and we are going to have a connection of other developments to the park. there will be direct connections from the towers and surrounding high-rises to the park. we are also working very closely with our team on putting out at some point soon, a concept of operations rfp that will be looking at both the facility, as well as the park level. and how to best operate it, and to secure it and insure that it is successful. we are looking at high line park here in new york as one of the models. that park has been successful and it does not have the level of taller connections that our park will have. and in addition to that, whereas you know we are going to be having a number of programming activities and an amp i theatre f
? >> excuse me. the police commission will hold a spefsh meeting at a location other than city hall. it will meet in the southern district at the south of market recreation center auditor um at 270, 6th street, san francisco, on wednesday, october 17th, 2012. at 6:00 p.m. comments to the public and southern station, acting captain steven bomo concerning the southern district. >> i was waiting for the clock to come on so it is still off. so i will speak. i am not going to take two minutes any way. briefly, commissioners, good evening. i just want to make reference to the so-called electronic control weapons that i believe are the tasers. and while we are not calling them tasers, that the public is familiar with. and two, that you are going to have these actual community meetings and schedule will there be posted on buses or newspapers with the media or the people to actually see or will they be listed on the site because part of the problem is the public at large is that when they tis the certain events they put it on buses and put out 1400 posters and get a community to show up. in
transportation is the life blood of all cities. right? this is it. >> central subway. >> from washington dc to san francisco we are here to accept brait a federally supported and grass-roots driven transit project that represents access for all to jobs, health care, their families. this is it. >> central subway. >> okay. a little extra. in the national play offs of life itself like buster posy we just hit a grand slam. this is it. >> central subway. >> it's been a long and difficult road towards a new and more inclusive transit system for san francisco neighborhoods, but we shall overcome. am i right? this is it. >> central subway. >> bless the construction workers and those that sacrifice so much -- you know who are you -- that san francisco can move towards a transit for the future and this is it and bless all of you on this wonderful day. thank you. [applause] >> before i invite the final speaker i just wanted to make sure i acknowledge senator mark leno for being here today. thank you very much. big champion for transportation in our state. steve mecher and thank you for being h
'm here to discuss proposition c the city currently uses federal, state and local funds to support affordable housing programs for both low income and moderate income households. recent federal cutbacks and reductions in state funding have decreased the funding available for affordable housing programs. proposition c would amend the charter to establish a housing trust fund. the city would contribute $20 million dollars to the fund in 2013. each year the city contribution would increase by 2.8 million dollars up to 50.8 million dollars in 2024. after 2024, the city would contribute an annual amount base the on the 50.8 million dollars but adjusted for changes in the city's general fund revenue. the city would use the fund to build, purchase and improve affordable housing, provide 15 million dollars for a loan program for down payment assistance for moderate income home buyers and emergency first responders and provide up to 15 million dollars for a program that would help eligible households avoid foreclosure. proposition c would change the affordable housing requirement for pri
of the city will not forget. it has a beautiful red rock formations. you could watch the sunrise over the bay. this is another one of our great lookouts. we are at mount davidson. 928 feet. this is the place for you to bring someone special. to not forget that dogs and enjoy all of the pathways and greenery that surrounds you. it provides a peaceful oasis of open space and great hiking trails. the spectacular view offers a perfect place to watch the sunrise or sunset with someone you love. >> it is a good place to get away from the hectic life of the city. come up here and listen to nature, i get some fresh air. that view is fantastic. >> where sturdy shoes. hikers get the feeling of being in a rain forest. mount davidson is also a great place to escape the noise and the bustle of the city. take the 36 bus and it will drop you at the entrance. it is quite a hike to the top but the view is worth every step. this is the place to bring that someone special. golden gate park's largest body of water is an enchanting place. is a popular spot for paddling around in boats, which can be rented. create
and have more of a discussion about what else the city can do to help the school district reach that objective? and i know that there is additional supportal funding that supervisor kim has introduced. and a number of us are supportive of that. but i would like to have an even greater discussion that goes beyond the specific amount of money. but what else is it that we can do to collectively reach that objective? because to the extent that resources are a big problem here, is there -- are there additional things that the city can do with the resources that we do have to help in this effort? and to me, that discussion will also involve a discussion about what different city agencies, what role they can play in this effort? you know, what is it -- what kind of support system is needed to help a student achieve academic success? and academic success doesn't just happen in the classroom. it's something that requires an entire community school district has the responsibility to make it happen. so i would like to figure out how we as a city and county can be even more helpful
bicycling as options to get around town. many cities in the world have far more people working or on bicycles into blocking or on bicycles. they are pleasant most of transit and are efficient. -- many cities in the world have far more people walking or on bicycles. they are pleasant and efficient forms of transportation. that will take cars off the road and make it easier for those who drive. if we want to create a world- class transportation system, we have to make a commitment to each of these modes of transit to allow us to move where we need to go. >> is it safe for pedestrians on the streets? >> it is not. in recent years, we have had too many pedestrian accidents. there are estimates it costs our cities several hundred millions a year because of traffic accidents, injuries, and fatalities. i am asking one of our transit agencies to study where we're spending our dollars around the district and whether we invested more money would help to reduce our overall costs that come when a pedestrian is hit by a car. >> let's talk about crime in your district. how is the police depa
done something wonderful for the city and we're all grateful. hopefully we will keep this thing going on for years and years to come. >> well good evening everyone. [speaking spanish] >> and thank you for coming tonight to celebrate the accomplishments of the latino community here in soon fran. >> welcome to the celebration here at city hall. >> i am mr. tores and director of neighborhood services. >> and i am ms. linqarga and work for the resource center. [applause] before we continue let's have another round for applause for dr. loco and the music provided. [applause] >> and tonight once the celebration and ceremony is over we hope you enjoy from refreshments and drinks with us. we have so much to celebrate tonight. >> and so many honorees to celebrate and are you true partners in making san francisco the best city in america in 2012. [applause] >> our theme for tonight's celebration is "community unity" because it's because of the collective efforts of the honorees across the diverse fields that bind us together. >> as we talk about about your programs and the media brings ho
of different needs in like merced that have built up over time and so the city will use this community engagement process to determine what's the best way to use that, once the bond passes ?oo ?a okay, thank you. so we have a little bit of time left so i'd like closing comments by both of you. thank you. >> well, i just want to follow-up on what he said. how interesting since 99 million dollars of the bond is ceqa approved? categorical exemption. so they are getting categorical exemptions through ceqa right now and what this leads to is complete lying to the voter. for example, when you go to golden gate park, beach solis, that was listed simply aiz categorical exemption for a field. all of a sudden you have a soccer stadium out of nowhere that the voters were never told about where they are going to change grass into turf i think a lot of this is very disingenuous and i think it's why neighborhoods are tired of rec and park. >> first, there's no soccer stadium. this bond is about current and future san franciscoans, especially our kids. this bond would pay for renovation of pla
, and these are measures we have had to take that have caused students to suffer and have caused all of city college to suffer. so that's why we're looking for an opportunity to bring in some funding from the city that we think san francisco taxpayers will support and that the state can't take away so that we can continue to serve san franciscoans. >> understood. i know there's a relationship with proposition 30 as well, of course, from the tax base and it's all connected and --. >> that's right. >> the tax is $79 per household. can you talk about that and how that would be an impact in your view? it's an 8-year tax. it's a finite tax. >> well, you know they say the only things permanent are death and taxes. once a new tax is implemented we often find even though it's called temporary when it gets passed, it ends up bking permanent or longer term than was discussed. i would love for my colleague here to tell us that she won't support extending that tax beyond the 8 years if it were to pass, but i believe that there's other ways that city college can stay afloat and continue to serve a declini
's been a collaborative effort in the city as well. i want to next introduce mohammed nuru director of public works who was instrumental in helping us launch this project. (applause) >> thank you. i'll keep it brief. i just want to say thank you to the department of public health for being a great partner with dpw. we've had a good opportunity to be able to renovate many of our health centers. we are building the new hospital and today this very, very great project. the project from dpw, we provided architectural design. we provided engineering and construction management. and i'd like to thank the team that worked on the project real quick, the project's architect, lamont and banito, please give them a hand. (applause) >> from the engineering james ing and ray louie, give them a hand. (applause) >> and for construction administration jose gordato. (applause) >> and, of course, from the public health side, mark primo from dpw, [speaker not understood] who both led these projects. a little quick note about the project itself, the building is over 100 years old. and while all this wor
of the 3000 people but passed away in 1906 from the devastating earthquake, but the rebirth of our city is with us. i have been in all of these other positions where we are always prepared. and we are already engaged in recovery efforts. we were there with a whole staff. we have six we assure you that when the next big event happens, that water system will be there for us to deliver water with that 24 hours. a huge change from depending on this fountain. we are handing it off to generations of youth in the city to understand -- make sure they're prepared. go to our website, it tells you all the things there. iti is about having those items prepared.w we will survive. that is how we get ready and celebrate and honor the people who left us and make sure our city is ready. thank you for being here. congratulations to our survivors. >> very nice job. behind me is a good friend and a great firechief. you go back 106 years. braxton morning. -- good morning. one of the survivors could not be with us. those are amazing changes. it does give us the opportunity to remember what happened. we comme
in san francisco because san francisco is one of the most innovative cities in the galaxy, and it's a very great place to be the home of the challenge america summit, the first-ever challenge america summit. so it's now my job to introduce our first speaker of the night, who is going to officially kick off the first-ever challenge america summit, somebody who has been verylfe instrumental in creating a movement around innovation in san francisco. just a few months ago, announced october as innovation month inla whole lot of work on, you know, creating a@g real ecosystem for entrepreneurs, for governments, for everybody to create new ideas and new innovations. please join me in welcoming mayor ed lee to the floor. >> [applause.] >> thank you. thank you, josh. welcome, everybody. now that i know where i'm at, i want to welcome all of you, i want to of course thank the night challenge -- night rover challenge, nasa, of course, for being here. i also want to thank s.p.u.r. again for hosting it. you know, when i started working with s.p.u.r. many years ago, i knew they were a spacey pe
concept and designs for the urban shopper and to complement the city's character and the small store offers the product but more suited to these lifestyles. instead of 20-pound bags of dog food you will find smaller bags and treats to manage to carry around. this is the first store in san francisco and we are activating our first stand alone active wear store and part of our brand by champion so what does it mean for you? high end apparel without the high end prices and what better way to introduce this concept than here in america's most active community and a joy to join the mayors in san francisco and nakd in 2011 we two contributed $2 million to san francisco and have awarded several schools with grants for field trips and completed our first library make over in san francisco last week at sanchez college prep elementary about 2 miles from here. we support the united way and employee contributions. as you can see we believe strongly in giving back to the community. speaking of community i would like to introduce one of san francisco's most influential leaders. present at t
for generations here in the city. we need to provide jobs. with when we talk about green jobs of future and sustainable produce, we need to talk about how to feed the single mothers in those communities. we need comprehensive reforms to bring those disadvantaged communitis with us. we cannot provide those folks with jobs unless we reform our drug policies in san francisco, which essentially disadvantage and persecute young men of color who on a day to day basis are being subjected to the criminal justice system in a way that is not done by other members of our society. >> you have got another minute. [ laughter ] >> on a day to day basis what we're doing here in san francisco is we are disenfranchising folks and limiting their ability for future employment. once you have a conviction for a non-violent drug-related crime, your chances of getting a future employment are essentially nil. there was a research study published recently in a san francisco newspaper, that showed the rate of drug convictions dropped, and the violent crime here in san francisco did not rise. essentially what w
city. i had them for over 40 years. they're gone but with that said i started two successful businesses in san francisco. i have a childrens' foundation "one children at a time inc." and did jobs around the world and every nickel i raised go to helping the kids. i will bring a strong budget control initiative to san francisco and i will show it by opening my district office in either on ocean avenue, lake side, and out of the money they give i will take a part of that fund and pay for that office in san francisco, but i will open it in the district so i will serve the people. bob squirey. i appreciate your support. >> thank you. mr. rogers. >> i am glen rogers and a native son of san francisco. i went to school here wanting to do public service and i went to sonoma state and majored in sociology and when i graduated i joined the peace corps in afghanistan. after returning i saw some lovely places and i wanted to be a landscape architect. i went to colpolly pomona and encouraged me to get involved in politics. i have been working on projects like civic centers, parks, f
quad droople the number of solar roofs we created 28 companies and created 450 jobs in the city and making san francisco the solar capitol of california. when people were losing their homes here in san francisco in call, there is plenty of talk and discussion about what to do, we commissioned the first report of its kind to make sure that there were facts behind the dialogue, and because of those facts that came out in our report, looking at foreclosures, finding fraud and finding inappropriate activities that happened by the lenders, action was taken and the home owner's bill of rights and i was proud to be one of the co-sponsors of the piece of legislation in the state. when people talk about fixing education, i first and foremost have that personal experience going into the public schools and going to uc berkeley and seeing my daughter attend a kindergarten every day. and i can tell you that there is no more important issue in our state than education and what we are doing. we need to make sure that it is a priority and it is getting funded and we can't continue to fund highe
and we feel like we paid 100 percent. the mayor's office has stopped this payment and the city keeps asking the people who live in san francisco, the voters, to pass bonds to continue it support the park system. the 2012 bpbld was originally scheduled for 2014 and it has been moved up. about 41 percent of the 2008 bond, 73 million dollars, has yet to be spent. so we're asking ourselves why now, why with so many parks, with so many problems are you coming to us when you don't even have the maintenance or operational people to maintain these parks? it's time for rec and park system to take care of the things that they build and not just continue to build things. thank you. >> thank you. so, matthew, my understanding is there is a current bond that's still in progress that hasn't been completed yet. why do you believe that we should have another bond issue while we still have one that's in progress? >> correct. great question. the 2008 parks bond passed by voters in 2008, obviously, covered 185 million dollars worth of investments in the park system. that sbair bond is already ful
. san francisco is the only city allowed to park its water in a national park. a hundred years we made that decision and bee think every hundred years san francisco should revisit that decision. there's no down side to that. but you can't do that without also reforming our 19th century water system. it was designed in the 19th century and as a result it's very damaging to the environment. what we do is look at how do we consolidate from 9 reservoirs into 8 and begin to build our local water resources to offset a small percentage of water loss that might happen. let's figure that out. let's not have a conversation based on hypobole, in terms of sean saying there are 7 reports saying it's not feasible, that's not true. what's unfortunate about all those is the city of san francisco has boycotted participating in those studies. san francisco says, wait a minute we have a unique responsibility here. we're the only city that stores our water in a national park so let's see how we can do better because we don't do a very good job. orange county recycles 30 million gallons of water a da
large maps and it took a long time to find the information. >> it saves the city time and money. you are not taking up the time of a particular employee at the assessor's office. you might be doing things more efficient. >> they have it ready to go and say, this is what i want. >> they are finding the same things happening on the phone where people call in and ask, how do i find this information? we say, go to this website and they go and get the information easily. >> a picture tells a thousand stories. stories. some say a map announcer: b dreams and good grades aren't enough to get into college. there are actual steps you need to take. finding someone who can help is the first and most important. for the next steps, go to knowhow2go.org. >> the meeting of come to order. good afternoon everyone. this is the monday september 24, 2012 meeting of the land use and economic development and the san francisco board of supervisors. our clerk is elisa miller. could you give us our announcements? >> please silence all audio equipment and items acted upon today will be on the next
is down. a variety of entertainment is what makes our city great. we will touch on the upcoming party legislation -- party bus legislation and a safe place for our youth to go. after our panel discussion will have some regard groups so we can share ideas and brainstorm. we have a very luminary panel here. right now, i would like to introduce our cheap -- chief of police. [applause] >> good afternoon. i also am not john newlin, and i have less hair than him. [laughter] is a pleasure to be here for the second year. there are fewer people here. that might be because it has been a good year. as audrey suggests i believe that is because of partnership is up. we want to be a police department that you are comfortable calling before anything happens with out fear of having us say, no, we are going to shut it down. we want to work with you to make it happen, but it means as safely as possible. certainly, alcohol always played a role as well as the age of the patrons, and on and on. again, please give us a chance to further develop the trust that we have been building over the last several yea
the toughest issues facing the city. welcome, supervisor. thank you for joining us. let's start by talking about your background -- where you grew up, what kinds of jobs you have work. supervisor chu: my parents immigrated to the united states about 30 years ago, and i would say that is probably the most formative part of my background. growing up in an immigrant family, you learn many things. my parents raised me in southern california, and i grew up in the restaurant business. they had a small restaurant at the time, and i was there every weekend, working -- well, not working, eating. having a fried egg roll, wanton, something good. it taught me the value of working hard and what it meant to be part of a small business, a small business -- a small business, small family, and an immigrant family at that. really being impacted by the los angeles riots, when that occurred, put me on the path toward public policy and understanding what it meant to have opportunities and not have opportunities in our various communities. >> why did you choose to live in san francisco? supervisor chu: i came t
new york is the most densely populated city in the u.s. and over 40 million tourists visit the city every year. the 1.3 billion gallons of water required every day are delivered by a system of extraordinary scale and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. bui
right things to continue our success in the city. part of that success, is to work with great corporate citizens like unico and their efforts to make sure that they give their best effort to hire san franciscoans. today we celebrate not just a flag ship store but a store that has made corporate responsibility at the helm of their friend. there is over 500 people that they have already hired in this store. that is a fabulous contribution. they have worked that magic with our office of economic development, having spent weeks to train people who may not have gotten this opportunity. but for their out reach in this store, and then, they created a buzz and excitement in our city. i know that people will not only appreciate the fabulous fashions here, that you just look at these prices, for the kind of quality that they have. and i know that we have smart shoppers like supervisor kim who will be here in a minute and others who look for that casmere brand and also are very affected by the price sensitivity of the quality store. and then i want to just give a shout out. there are peo
over the city and it has to do with this door. this is a door that's hinged to swing out over the sidewalk. we have that all over the city with the metal graets and security bars is this allowed? >> they are allowed. we look at the neighborhood pattern. we look at the part of town its in. it is as long as its see through. required by the planning department, and as long as it -- we know it springs out feet and self closing mechanism, on a spring. on brand-new ones we require an audio alarm or a flashing light. audio or video alarm that if a blind person is walking along the sidewalk they don't get hit but somebody opening their door. >> there is a conflict with the building code that says you can only have a door swing 12 inches over the sidewalk. i know we are trying to bring this in for awhile. >> before you leave there is something important you show show everyone on the sidewalk. >> the graffiti spray paint? what is this on the sidewalk. point it out. >> these are under ground service markings. state law requires any time anybody excavates. may be because they have a
the capital the city that it is today. but amid this cultural mosaic, this swelling city faces some serious challenges. delhi sits on the banks of two large rivers, catal city for aongsuccess, the ganges aheamuna. delhi s fomamanyea its lonvarious peoplesfnks have left their mark on delhi. for instance, remnants of the islamic domination that started in the 12th century can be seen in old delhi. new delhi was built in the british colonial period at the end of the 19th century. its tidy grid-line streets and office buildings offer a sharp contrast to the narrow, bustling streets of old delhi. today the power that is shaping delhi is economics. beginning in the early 1900s, india made a strong push toward liberalizing its economy. with its strong international ties, s be quick keeping pace with the changing environment. products a coming in frombroad, and on their srttails comeele. with the changing environment. delhi's life-sty is cngg a. ( bus horn blaring ) drawn by the appeal of the city and the liberalized economy, more and more people are moving to delhi from the countryside. however,
and complete their city college. it is not just about a degree. it is about whether that degree leads to full employment. that is what people are looking for. this is what rodrigo stands out in my mind amongst all the people that we had a chance to take a look at. he has been involved as a pro bono structural engineer. his firm is a structural engineering firm, but he has been a part of many of our local nonprofits to have their projects successful in the past 20 years. i know rodrigo is a stronger performer. he is an advocate on behalf of students and he is committed to our city college and it will not lose its accreditation with rodrigo's help. [applause] for these reasons, i am presenting to you, rodrigo, as a great asset to our city college, and i want to thank him for stepping up and accepting this appointment at a time when we really need reform. thank you to you, jenny, and the two kids for supporting you as well. it is most important than ever before that we do whatever it takes to get our city college back on its feet, for the sake of current and future city college students, for the
.org. remember, early voting is available at city hall monday through friday from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm if you don't vote early, be sure hi, i'm richard janning, board member of the league of women voters. along with the league and sf gof tv, i'm here to discuss proposition e the city requires businesses it pay a flat 1.5 percent tax on payroll cost for work performed in the city. small businesses with less than 250,000 dollars in payroll costs are exempt from the tax. proposition e would create a new city business tax based on gross receipts rather than payroll costs. under the new system, the tax on payroll cost would be eliminated or reduced. businesses with gross receipts of less than 1 million dollars annually will be exempt from the gross receipts tax. the gross receipts tax rate would vary depending on the type of business and its annual gross receipts from its activity in the city. certain businesses that have their headquarters or administrative offices in san francisco that operate primarily in other locations would pay the gross receipts tax based on payroll costs. proposition e w
on the sidewalk. i want to makeÑ$+ ñ/f sure thats the city's responsible to get items that have been left out on the sidewalk off the sidewalk within 24 in addition ¿Ñ items left on the sidewalk, graffiti that appears on city property, i want this off city property within 24 hours so that it doesn't proliferate around the neighborhood. in addition to5.2 these two thi, have a plan in place in which we replace all of our roads and sidewalks every 10 years. the first job of government is t neighborhood is both safe and clean. these two priorities have not beenh4 met. as supervisor, i will make sure that we focus on. these are the priorities that are important. remember, if yourf house -- if don't redecorate. you fix the roof first. as supervisor, that's what i'm going to focus on, making sure > safe@ouc =' everyone. i'm eric mar and i represent district 1-rbgs the richmond on san francisco's board of super i'm running for reelection endorsed by the san francisco democratic party and i response to continue representing you for the next in my first term i've worked restore theájá san franci
.1. welcome to the tuesday october 30th meeting of the board of supervisors of the city and county of san francisco, home of the world champion san francisco giants. madam clerk, can you please call the roll? >> supervisor avalos? >> present. >> avalos present. supervisor campos? campos present. president chiu? chiu president. supervisor chu? chu absent. supervisor cohen? cohen presented. supervisor elsbernd? elsbernd present. supervisor farrell? farrell present. supervisor kim? kim present. supervisor mar? mar present. supervisor olague? olague present. supervisor wiener? wiener present. mr. president, you have a quorum. >> thank you. colleagues, could we have a motion to excuse hrchu? motion by supervisor campos, seconded by supervisor olague without objection, she shall be excused. ladies and gentlemen, please join me in the pledge of allegiance. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america, and to the republic for which it stands; one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. >> colleagues, we have our september 13th and september 25th
. i have materials we passed out to city employees and business and happy to answer any questions that you have. >> may i ask a question? thank you. i actually just have one question. since the launch of bmw's recent one way car sharing program, could you talk to us a little about the benefits we're getting out of the program where they're working the downtown area? >> so, the bmw car sharing program, the reason that we got behind raising awareness about the launch of that program in san francisco is it's unique in that it added 50 plug-in electric vehicles to the suite. so, that was an unusual development for a car sharing company. because they're a private company, we aren't tracking the success and don't actually have any control over that program. really from our perspective the compelling component was those 50 electric vehicle plug-ins are added to our space and are available to you. >> in terms of value, the the city gets urban bragging rights, we have the electric car? >> the intrinsic value, additional options for peep to access the vehicle if they don't want to buy one t
dime. it's not unusual, it happens everyday in the city by the bay, you will find it happens all the time. the city will never do what you want it to, why can't this crazy city be mine? it's not unusual to not even have any work at any time. it's not unusual to lose your job. it's such a crime. if you should ever maybe want your back in the city changes its mind. it's not unusual sheriff mirkarimi to welcome you back. welcome back. hey hey hey, welcome back. welcome back. moons and junes and ethics, dizzy dancing. when every sheriff's dream becomes real i have looked at city life that way. i have looked at city from all districts now, from win and lose and we'll still try somehow. it's life's city allusions i recall. i really don't know politics at all. >> thank you, next speaker. >> my my name is eugene gordon, jr.. fascists, anti-fascists, and need to know san francisco main public library reports 2012 nobel price for peace democracy was awarded to european union. congratulations to the government, imperialists, but these artificial doves don't fly. going in and out of conte
the city at 30 miles an hour, it will be less than half of the power of a toaster. it's equivalent to 850 miles a gallon to be on one of these electric scooters. i think it's safe, obviously we're going train people in the right way to abide but all the traffic regulations that we have, but as i sit in my car on days where i have to wait and 7, watch these scooters go by, it's kind of like where am i and what am i doing and can i contribute even more, so it's exciting to see this happen in san francisco, to see its launch, it's exciting that it's an idea that incubated out of the hub, it's exciting to not only see that it's fun for people to get around, to be more efficient and to kind of stralgts the lanes, but it's exciting to know it contributes so much of the goals of this city, the goals that i know our department environment is leading the effort and our city is leading the effort, the board of supervisors working with my office to show case every opportunity we can to have alternative modes, and getting off of oil, it's going to be explained to you in simple terms how you get on th
[inaudible] of working in a smart and efficient way. we work together on the program as smart cities where we want san francisco -- other cities to be modern cities but also civilized cities which means that consider that everything we wish for as far as economic development is concerned must consider the environment also, and the quality of the planet on which we live. with mr. lee, we talked about all these questions and of course we are going encourage all of these new companies and everything that enables us to improve our cities and make them a better place to live and less polluted place to live, as may it in transportation, management of energy, in san francisco and in paris, there are innovations that are certainly ahead of many other cities in the world and i want to learn from san francisco and of course paris is there for the san francisco team, may it be a development of electric transportation or automobiles or [inaudible] or the reuse of energy of heat to heat private buildings or public building by using waste water, i explained to mayor lee that a couple of years now, i worked
. a great way to get out and play. >> for more information, across america, cities and towns, homes and businesses all depend upon one basic resource. modern civilization and life itself would be impossible without it. woman: okay, so today, we're going to look at how do we get our water? narrator: and today, it's a matter of simply turning on the tap. so often, we forget about the value of water. water is a commodity that is essential to life. 100 years ago, it would have been hard to imagine turning on the tap water. and now, it's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our qualit
in city government do not come from the politicians. they come from all of you. i want to thank spur for helping to convene not just the smartest people in san francisco, but the smartest people from around the world to help us figure out how to innovate. it is my honor to introduce the first award thee of this evenin. this is a very unique award. this is the lifetime achievement award. mfac has to select one individual out of 26,000 who best exemplifies what service is to our city. when i was first elected to office, i asked a lot of people, literally hundreds of people, who is the smartest person in government. with all due respect to the other smart people in this room, there was one name that came up over and over again. that was our awardee. whenever i have a question that was difficult to answer, i would ask my staff, who are we going to call? the same name always came up. it was our awardee. i'm going to tell a story that has not yet been told publicly, but i'm going to share it today. in late 2010, when the board of supervisors, when we were casting around for someone to play
helen diller. together with the clean and safe neighborhood parks fund and the city's general fund. >> 4. 3. 2. 1. [applause] >> the playground is broken into three general areas. one for the preschool set, another for older children, and a sand area designed for kids of all ages. unlike the old playground, the new one is accessible to people with disabilities. this brand-new playground has several unique and exciting features. two slides, including one 45- foot super slide with an elevation change of nearly 30 feet. climbing ropes and walls, including one made of granite. 88 suspension bridge. recycling, traditional swing, plus a therapeutics win for children with disabilities, and even a sand garden with chines and drums. >> it is a visionary $3.5 million world class playground in the heart of san francisco. this is just really a big, community win and a celebration for us all. >> to learn more about the helen diller playground in dolores park, go to sfrecpark.org. >> welcome to city hall. thank you for joining us. thank you for coming out. i want to thank members of the board of super
was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water now comes from the delaware river, early engineers found that development along the waterfront was causing pollution. so their search led them to the nearby schuylkill river. philadelphia developed technologies to pump water from the river into the city. these technologies established engineering concepts that
housing stock which our city badly needs. and now the planning commissioner, i made sure that new housing includes units that are accessible for middle and lower income people. i introduced requirements that market rate housing developers invest in public open space, transit affordable housing and child care as a condition for approval of their projects. for the last nine months, as d-five supervisor, i have demonstrated how i will governor if elected for a full term. my office has worked on parking, and tour bus issues in alamo square and nopa and violence in the poor conditions of our public housing in the fillmore and western addition. and dealing with liability and the overcrowding of muni and ped and bike safety. we are advocating for additional bike lanes on oak and other issues. on all of these my job as district five supervisor has been to respond as fast as possible and make sure that city hall is working for everyone in the district. on november 6th, i hope that you will vote chris teen olague for district five supervisor, i am the most qualified candidate in the race. >> hello,
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